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Chapter 1: Newspaper Engagement Announcements Wording & Etiquette

Newly engaged and want to tell the world? Create an engagement announcement! A newspaper engagement announcement is one of the first opportunities for a couple to announce their engagement to the public using their local and city press. We are here to help the process of choosing engagement announcement wording and submitting the announcement to the press easy.

To begin, contact the news source in which you plan on placing the announcement. You can reach them by phone or by using an internet search engine with the query [newspaper to which you would like to submit] + engagement announcement. In some cases such as the Los Angeles Times, the newspaper provides a form for you to fill out, which they use to compile your wedding details into their own newspaper format. In other instances, particularly with smaller newspapers, the submitter may choose the engagement announcement wording.



Storkie Tip: While the brides'
immediate family traditionally takes
on the responsibility of finding
the appropriate newspaper(s) and
writing the piece, today, more and
more couples submit their own
announcements.

Writing a Newspaper Engagement Announcement & Wording

Since newspapers charge by column size, it is in your best interest to be concise. Typically written in the past tense (since the engagement has already occurred), the announcement is from the point-of-view of the party hosting the wedding, traditionally the parents of the bride-to-be.

Details to include

  • Month and year of expected wedding date (only include the wedding date if wedding venue is secure prior to the announcement)
  • Person Officiating
  • Place and city of wedding
  • Bride's name
  • Bride's city, state
  • Bride's age
  • Bride's parents
  • Bride's parents' city and state of residence
  • Bride's schools, degrees and organizations
  • Bride's current employer and occupation
  • Groom's name
  • Groom's city, state
  • Groom's age
  • Groom's parents
  • Groom's parents' city and state of residence
  • Groom's schools, degrees and organizations
  • Groom's current employer and occupation
  • Honeymoon
  • Couple's future city of residence

Etiquette for Acknowledging Family

Since the announcement comes from the point-of-view of the wedding hosts, the first sentence in the engagement announcement wording may change based on the family dynamics. For instance, a standard wedding announcement might say:

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Smith of New York, New York
are pleased to announce the engagement of
their daughter Jane Smith, to Jonathan Jackson,
son of David and Elaine Jackson of Canterbury,
New Hampshire. Ms. Smith, a graduate of
Wellesley College, is a curator for a private art
gallery in New York City. Mr. Jackson
graduated cum laude from Columbia, and
practices in the Law Offices of Franklin, Murray
in Brooklyn, New York. An October wedding is planned.


Storkie Tip: You are not obligated to
mention both biological parents.

However, sometimes family dynamics are not as simple. Below are suggested announcement introductions for alternative circumstances:

Acknowledging a divorced parent of the bride or groom

Ms. Debora Smith is pleased to announce the engagement of her daughter, Jane Smith, to Jonathan Jackson… Ms. Smith is also the daughter of Joseph Smith of New York. (Place this line at the end of the announcement.)

Acknowledging a remarried parent of the bride or groom

Ms. Debora Smith and Mr. George Bell announce the engagement of Ms. Smith's daughter, Jane Smith to Jonathan Jackson… Ms. Smith is also the daughter of Joseph Smith of New York.

Acknowledging a deceased parent of the bride or groom

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Smith of New York, New York are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter Jane Smith to Jonathan Jackson, son of Elaine Jackson and the late Mr. David Jackson of Canterbury, New Hampshire.

If the couple is hosting the wedding, or if this is a second or third marriage

Jane Smith, a curator for a private art gallery in
New York City, is to be married to Jonathan Jackson,
a partner at the Law Offices of Franklin, Murray
in Brooklyn, New York. Ms. Smith is the daughter of
Mr. Joseph Smith of Lincoln, Nebraska
and Mrs. Debora Smith of Orlando, Florida.
Mr. Jackson is the son of David and Elaine Jackson
of Canterbury, New Hampshire. An October wedding
is planned.

When to Announce Your Engagement

Traditionalists recommend that you announce your engagement at least two to three months prior to the wedding date.

Where to Announce Your Engagement

  • In the local newspaper where you currently reside. If the bride and groom live in two different cities, create an announcement for each paper.
  • Alumni magazines or college newspapers – especially if the bride and groom graduated from the same school.
  • News sources near extended friends or family members.

Guidelines for Including an Image

Submitting a photo with your engagement announcement will cost extra, but it's an exciting way to make your announcement stand out in the newspaper and introduce friends and relatives to your fiancé.


Storkie Tip: Selecting an image where
couple’s heads and eyes are on
the same level will create symmetry in
the picture.

Here are a few guidelines for submitting a photo with your engagement announcement:

Submitting a photo by mail

  • Include couple's name and date of wedding on back
  • Include photographer's name if credit is required
  • Avoid images with red-eye
  • Avoid busy or loud backgrounds
  • Images should be sharp and in focus
  • Ideal photos are an 8x10 vertical picture

Submitting a photo by email

  • Save photo in a JPEG file format
  • Minimum 300 DPI at 8x10 size
  • Include photographer's name if credit is required
  • Save the image file using the couple's last name and "engagement announcement photo"
    • Example: Smith-Jackson_engagement_announcement_photo.jpg

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